Beechfield

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Jersey houses


Beechfield, Trinity


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This 19th century house was home to 20th century Bailiff of Jersey, Sir Peter Crill


Property name

Beechfield

Previous names

Beechfield House

Location

Beechfield Lane, Trinity

Type of property

A three-storey 19th century house with 17th century farm buildings

Valuations

The property was sold for £4 million in 2007

Families associated with the property

Datestones

  • PLB SDG - For Pierre Le Breton, son of Servais, and Sara de Gruchy who married in Trinity in 1640
  • SDG PLB TLB MLB SLB ELB ELB - This stone is very unusual in that it represents Sara de Gruchy and her six Le Breton children: Pierre, Thomas, Marie, Sara, Elizabeth and Esther. It is on the barn at rear of the property and was mistakenly interpreted by Joan Stevens as standing for Sarah and her husband Pierre, and only five children, but the PLB has since been recognised as representing their son, Pierre jnr.
  • TLB 1669, 1671, 1673 and TLB SPD - For Thomas Le Breton and Sara Poingdestre
  • JEML MMTG 1822 - For Jean Emily who married Marguerite Mattingley on 9 March 1816 in Trinity

Historic Environment Record entry

Listed building

A fine and substantial early 19th century Jersey house with well proportioned interior and exterior features, linked to 17th century farm buildings retaining original interior and exterior features. Shown on the Richmond Map of 1795. Circa 1832 house built to the west of earlier property believed to have origins to at least 1640. Earlier house, later stables retain 17th century features.

The five-bay house has two storeys and a basement, with a two-storey 1950s extension to the west. A range of 17th century farm buildings have been converted to residential use.

Old Jersey Houses

The author must have known the property well - it belonged to a close friend - and it is cited as an example of a number of architectural features, with several drawings included. She refers in some detail to a mystery broken datestone and also misinterprets the stone listing the Le Breton children (see above).

It is now clear that this was the home of a branch of the Le Breton family from at least 1640, or possibly earlier. The domestic party of the buildings, later demoted into stables, has retained some 17th century features on the north, but shows three storeys, which is most rare. It can only be explained by the slope of the ground which would have given two levels on the south, now obscured by pig sties.[1]

Jean Emily was a nephew of the last Le Breton owner, Daniel, who died in 1816. Some years before altering the farm buildings he built the impressive main house, with a drive to the west. He must have been engaged in some profitable business to build himself such a superior house on the farm he had inherited through his mother, Sara Le Breton. [2]

The staircase is particularly elegant.

Notes and references

  1. This paragraph is somewhat confusing, because the three-storey house is the main residential part of the property, and almost certainly was at the time the description was published. As mentioned in the listed building description above, this is a 19th century house.
  2. The Emily family appears to have died out in Jersey during the 20th century. The last male to be born was John Alphonsus, born in Trinity in 1882. He was the son of John Adophus. John Alphonsus emigrated to Canada in 1906, returning briefly the following year to marry Alice Sowdon, before moving back to Canada with her. Their first child, Gweneth, was born in Winnipeg in 1909. The first member of the Emily family in Jersey was Thomas, who came to the island from England and married Marthe Poiongdestre in 1756. Their son George married Sara Le Breton in 1780, and their son Jean, who married Marguerite Mattingley, inherited Beechfield. There are some church records missing at this time but it appears that Jean and Marguerite had a son Jean, who was the father of John Adolphus, who married Clara Jane Dallain in 1857
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