Jersey Times 1848 - 6

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6 June - 6 July 1848
Advertisement
Sea-bathing in the bay of St Aubin

A Blandy respectfully informs his friends and public that his Machines are now ready for use. For card of terms apply at the office of the brewery, about ten minutes’ walk from the Royal Square, St Helier. Two female servants to attend ladies and children when required.

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Notice
Thefts from wreck

Some persons, having sawed the gallant masts of the ship Nadob, sunk near the Ecrehous Rocks, and carried away some sails and other effects belonging to the said vessel.

This is to give notice that all persons found near the said vessel with the intention of appropriating to themselves will be prosecuted according to law.

All persons who have in their possession or who might find any portion of the said vessel, are required to give information of same to Wm Ranwell Esq, Lloyds Surveyor.

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Daguerreotypography
Tuesday 20 June 1848

The gentlemen from the Daguerreotypography establishment in Guernsey are, we understand, about to pay a visit to the Island for the purpose of exercising their art.

We have seen many of the portraits and land and sea views taken by these gentlemen, and we must confess that Daguerreotypography has, in their hands, attained to a degree of excellence of which we had hitherto scarcely supposed it to be possible. [1]

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Attempted escape from gaol
Tuesday 20 June 1848

One of the convicts under sentence of Jersey gaol for the robbery of the Post Office has, we understand, been detected in an attempt to make an escape by undermining the ground of his cell. He is said to have made considerable progress in his enterprise.

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Advertisement
Beghin's sale

Messrs P Beghin and Co, of 37 Broad Street, Jersey, continue to sell, at fresh and enormous sacrifices, the whole of their extensive stock of goods, consisting of linen, shawls, skins, wines, the newest stock of fashionable articles etc.

They have also on sale a cart, a phaeton and harness as well as furniture of a handsome drawing-room.

A Ville de Paris

The confidence which is re-establishing itself daily in Paris having given fresh vigour to the modes, which had been relaxed by the late events in France, induced Madame Descours Beghin to repair to Paris in order to be present to identify the newest modes, which have just been issued, and are now issuing, in the Capital, and to replenish her stock of the newest articles, which the ladies of Jersey will be certain to appreciate as they deserve.

Madame Beghin has already received a large selection of cashmere and other shawls, long and square, of the newest patterns, which she is enabled to sell under the manufacturing prices. She is just arrived from Paris, with a magnificent assortment of all the latest nouveautée.

Madame Descours Beghin is in want of several apprentices, and she pledges herself to make them finished ouvrières, if they will but properly study the business.

Editorial comment
Tuesday 13 June 1848
Need for court and night police

That we have not at this moment a Daily Police Court and a Town Night Police, is no fault of the Constable of St Helier; but that of Party opposition, and of the obstinate and short-sighted bigotry of the less-informed of his own Constituents, who, in ludicrous imitation of an illustrious example over the water, doggedly declared things as they were to be perfection, and, to prove their sincerity, generously hooted down a Jersey gentleman of education, who preferred addressing them in English rather than in French, or in the vernacular variety of the latter language.

But, for those much-needed Institutions – a Daily Police Court and Court of Requests, and a Night Police for St Helier – the public, and the British portion of it more particularly, still look to Mr Le Sueur; and we trust that he will ere long, despite all opposition, be enabled to realise to very rational and moderate an expectation.

As an incentive to these and other further good public works, the Testimonial, which has suggested these few remarks cannot but operate persuadingly upon such a mind as that of Mr Le Sueur; whose heart and hope are evidently centred in his native country, and in that alone; and we may hope that the day of its presentation will serve him as a fresh starting-point in his career as a reformer and improver of the political institutions of the Island.

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Calamitous accident
Friday 30 June 1848

After the review of the North Regiment of the Militia on Monday last, the Officers of the Regiment partook of a splendid dinner at Pontac.

About 9 o’clock at night they entered an omnibus to return home and the Band of the Regiment, 17 in number, mounted upon its roof, at their invitation.

Scarcely had it started, than by some accident it was overset, precipitating the unfortunate musicians to the ground and severely injuring five of them.

One, named Jenkins, had his thigh broken close to the hip; another, Deslandes, had his shoulder dislocated; a third, Cabot, had his arm broken; a fourth was dreadfully cut in his upper jaw; and a fifth had his head dreadfully disfigured. The wounded men were re-conveyed to the hotel, where they received the surgical aid of Dr Le Cocq.

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Boat hits rock
Friday 23 June 1848

The cutter D, whilst on her passage to this Island, struck on the Minquiers rocks on Sunday morning. The crew succeeded in keeping her up and got her into the harbour where she sank immediately on arrival.

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The new pier
Friday 23 June 1848

We heartily congratulate the contractors, the surveyors, and the mercantile interest of Jersey, on the rapidity with which the works at the New Pier are proceeding. Within the last month an extensive stage, 150 yards in length and six in breadth, of solid timber, with flooring, has been carried out from the south west angle of the old South Pier towards the New Pier head, this making an additional passway for the conveyance of material at all times of the tide.

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Boy hit by horse
Friday 23 June 1848

As a brigade of the Artillery was passing along Halkett Place yesterday (Thursday) a little boy, the son of Mr Hamon, Grocer, King Street, running out to see them, was knocked down by one of the horses and received a wound in the forehead, which, however, we have reason to hope will not prove very serious.

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Fire at St John
Tuesday 27 June 1848

At about half past 6 o’clock on Friday morning last, a fire broke out in the house of Mr Joshua Sarre near St John’s Church, in which two or three families resided as lodgers.

The house, stock and furniture, were all destroyed. People were afraid to make any attempt to check the flames as a barrel of gunpowder was known to be in the premises which, on exploding, blew portions of the house to a distance of three-quarters of a mile.

A poor women, enceinte, and near her confinement, was taken from the house in a state of insensibility and now lies in a dangerous condition. The house and stock, we believe, were insured in the Sun office, but the lodgers’ furniture and other property were uninsured.

The cause of the fire is not known.

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Landing at low tide
Tuesday 26 June 1848

Some months ago a proposition was lodged au Greffe in the States, for the construction of a slip at the extremity of Victoria Harbour for the convenience of travellers who arrive at low tide. It is desirable in the extreme that this improvement should be effected, for it is both inconvenient and dangerous for a person to be compelled to climb into cars or up on men’s backs ere they can land. We trust the States will give their speedy attention to this matter.

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Throat cut
Friday 30 June 1848

A young man from St Clement’s was taken to the Hospital on Monday and confined, he having attempted to cut his own throat on the previous day. His father did the same thing a few weeks since and is also in the Hospital.

W19QueenVictoria.jpg

HM Birthday
Tuesday 6 June 1848

On Saturday 27 May the 54th Depot fired a feu de joie from the ramparts at Fort Regent at 12 o’clock in honour of Her Majesty’s birthday.

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Advertisement
For sale cheap

Well-known and convenient premises known as Marine Lodge, pleasantly situated at Millbrook, St Aubin’s Road (within two miles of the Royal Square). Commands a full view of the Bay, has every requisite convenience for a respectable family, coach house, stabling, greenhouse, green paddock with a shady walk leading to the sea, most convenient for bathing. For particulars apply Mr P Bichard, Solicitor, 16 Hill Street or Mr Le Ber, House Agency Office, Royal Square.

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Mr Robert Patterson
Tuesday 6 June 1848

We beg to call the attention of our readers to the announcement of this gentlemen which appears in our present columns. Mr Patterson is well known in this Island as an accomplished harp player; and we have no doubt that many ladies will avail themselves of his brief stay amongst us to familiarise themselves with the latest-composed morceaux for the harp, under the able and practised guidance of Mr Patterson.

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Advertisement
Royal Hotel

Royal Hotel, Pier Road, St Helier, Jersey R Stone, in returning thanks to the Nobility, Gentry and Visitors, begs to inform them that the above Hotel is now conducted in a superior style, being replete in every respect, and the situation being such as to surpass any hotel in the Island, commanding the entire view of the beautiful bay of St Aubin’s.

R.S. has been particular in selecting his wines and spirits, and trusts, by adhering to moderate charges combined with attention and civility, that the above Hotel will be found worthy of the support of all visitors who may honour him with their patronage.

A splendid commercial coffee room and private sitting rooms.

NB: Carriages, gigs, cars and saddle horses on the shortest notice.

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News from Gaspé
Tuesday 13 June 1848

We have received from the Gaspé Gazette of May 12 of the arrival there of the brig Patruus from Jersey having on board John Fauvel Esq, lady and family. The Patruus reported a number of vessels detained in the Gulf by ice.

There was an immense quantity of herring all along the coast and the fishermen had commenced taking cod.

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Boy drowned
Tuesday 20 June 1848

A little boy named La Perrelle, whilst going after his goats with another child on the rocks on the Trinity coast, slipped into the sea and was drowned.

The dog nuisance again:
Lady knocked unconscious
in street
Tuesday 23 June 1848

On Saturday afternoon, at about 3 o’clock, as the lady of H C White Esq was passing along Halkett Place, having a few moments before parted from her daughter and Mr White, she was violently run against and thrown down upon her back by two huge dogs, one of which had some offal in its mouth, which the other was pursuing him to obtain.

Taken up senseless, Mrs White was conveyed into the shop of Mr Aubin, the chymist, near to which the accident occurred, where every attention was immediately paid to her.

On her recovering her consciousness, she had the immediate care of Dr Jolit, when it was discovered that she had received a serious wound on the back of her head. This the Doctor dressed, and Mrs White was then conveyed in a carriage to her residence, where, we regret to state, she still continues to suffer very seriously from her wounds and other dreadful effects of her fall.

Is this abominable dog nuisance, we ask, to continue, despite the States and their special enactment to put it down? What avail good laws if they be allowed to remain a dead letter by those whose duty it is to carry them into effect?

The Police of St Helier were, we understand, to hold a meeting last evening on the subject; and they will, we trust, take measures forthwith to clear our streets from the curs which still infest them, to, as we have now again too fatally seen, the imminent danger of the lives and limbs of the community.

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Child bitten by a dog
Friday 23 June 1848

As a little boy, about seven years of age, a son of Mrs Campbell, the well-known laundress, was bird-nesting with other children along a fence on the grounds of a farmer named Cabot at the back of Almorah Terrace, some of the people of the farm are supposed to have set a large Newfoundland dog upon them, which, seizing little Campbell by the left arm above the elbow, bit him so severely that the blood flowed copiously from the wound.

On the poor child reaching home, his mother obtained the surgical assistance of Mr Steele, who cleaned and cauterised the bitten place.

The dog seemed perfectly gentle and unaffected by any malady, and it is therefore to be hoped that no serious consequences will result to the child.

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Man stuck in drain
Friday 30 June 1848

During the sports at St Aubin’s on Monday last a young thief entered a drain which opens opposite the house of Mr Coleman; but after arriving at the other extremity, he could neither proceed nor turn back, and must have been suffocated had not his cries brought assistance. The pathway had to be cut through to enable him to extricate himself from his dirty dilemma.

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St Catherine’s
Friday 30 June 1848

Mr Walker, the Engineer in charge of the St Catherine’s works, is about to establish a school for the children of the work people employed there. These children, numbering about 150 and upwards, are at present without any education. There are numerous applicants for the post of teacher, but we believe the person appointed must be approved of by the Rector of the Parish, the Rev George Balleine.

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Hunting
Tuesday 4 July 1848

Several gentlemen intend meeting at Prince’s Tower on Wednesday 5 July between one and two o’clock to discuss the practicability of establishing a well-appointed pack of small harriers in this Island; and as they are already promised the support of many native Gentlemen of influence and Farmers, they request the attendance of all those who enjoy this healthy and rational sport, and all those whose interest it is to encourage it.

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Town hall needed
Tuesday 4 July 1848

A Town Hall continues to be an especial consideration in St Helier. We understand that much attention of parties in authority has been directed to the large building (formerly the French Wesleyan Chapel) in Don Street, which is now purchasable for a “mere song”, compared with its original cost and the value of the ground upon which it stands. With little, and not expensive alteration, it could be converted into an excellent Town Hall.

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American ship grounded
Tuesday 4 July 1848

On Thursday afternoon last, as the American ship Lady of the Lake, Captain Smith, was making for the harbour, when about five or six cables length from the pier head the pilot, not considering there was water enough to enter, attempted to wear the ship around but, in the act of doing so, the vessel would not answer to the helm and she went aground about a quarter of a mile from the North Pier head.

A very liberal offer was made by Mr Mallet, Lloyd’s surveyor, to Captain Paul of the Monarch steamer, which had arrived from Southampton and had just landed her passengers, but the latter refused, demanding, in case he went out and towed her in safely, to be paid salvage.

This was not agreed by Mr Mallet and, assistance having been sent out to the vessel, she was got off and moored in the harbour the same evening, having apparently suffered very little damage.

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The late gales
Tuesday 4 July 1848

On the night of Friday week, several cutters left the Island coast for conger fishing. One of them, the Clipper, manned by Mr Ph Becquet of the Landes of St Owen, and Mr Ph Du Feu of the Vaux-de-la-Mare, went down on Saturday morning week, off L’Etacq, both of them being drowned in her.

Mr Becquet leaves a widow and five children. Mr Du Feu was a young man of about 24 years of age, who had been engaged several years in the fisheries at Newfoundland, but who did not go there this year, as his father had a presentiment that he would be drowned on his return there.

The grief of the father at the calamity can better be imagined than expressed. Another boat, which started at the same time, manned by Mr Ph Laurens of St Lawrence and another, has not been since heard of; and there is every reason to fear that she has experienced the melancholy fate of the Clipper.

Notes and references

  1. A demonstration of Deguerreotypography had taken place in Jersey as early as 1840
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