La Rigondaine

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Jersey houses


La Rigondaine, Grouville


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Property name

La Rigondaine

Other names

These three property names were previously associated with La Rigondaine, but are now separate residential units

  • La Petite Rigondaine
  • La Rigondaine Farm
  • Cote de La Rigondaine

Location

La Rigondaine, Grouville

Type of property

18th century house with rear courtyard

Valuations

  • La Rigondaine sold for £2,190,000 in 2018 after being marketed for £2.5 million
  • Cote de La Rigondaine sold for £1,550,000 in 2019

Families associated with the property

Datestones

The three datestones which have been identified allow us to trace the Graut family's presence through three generations from grandfather Josue to son Josue, to grandson Josue. [1] The first is inscribed

  • IG EAM 1786, for Josue Graut and Elizabeth Amy. This Josue was born in 1750. There is no record of his marriage to Elizabeth, but it must have been in about 1774, the year before the birth of their first son, Josue. He married Anne Gallichan - again there is no surviving marriage record - in about 1796, the year before the third Josue was born. He married Marguerite Jennes (or Jeune) in about 1822. They must have been living at La Rigondaine by 1841, when a stone was erected on the eastern portion of the house, bearing the inscription
  • JG ♥♥ MJ 1841 There are also stones at the property inscribed
  • IG and JG 1870
  • IMR EM 1726 - The names associated with this stone have not been identified. It is suggested by the Datestone Register to be for Pierre Marett and Anne Messervy, which hardly seems a possible match for the initials.
  • NPC MAPP 1830 - For Nicolas Perchard (seaman), son of Thomas and Marie Ann Pepin, daughter of Philippe, who married in St Saviour in 1866. The Datestone Register suggests that the stone has been re-carved with the initials of the 1866 owners, leaving the earlier date, as evidenced by the difference in the styles of lettering between the initials and the date.
  • FDLM IAH 1831 - Probably for Francois de La Mare and Jeanne Esther Ahier [2]

Historic Environment Record entry

Listed building

This mid-late 18th century house contributes to its rural setting with its gable and boundary defining the roadside. The grouping around the rear courtyard remains intact. The house has fine stonework and largely retains its integrity in plan, and has historic features internally and externally. A house on this site is shown on the Richmond map of 1795.

The round arch and dated stones from two adjoining and now demolished houses have been incorporated into the new structure.

The main farmhouse has lean-to to west and single storey 20th century extension to east. Single storey outbuildings run northward on east boundary, returning in two-storey converted barn, with throughway, to create north side of courtyard. To the northwest are pigsties.

Old Jersey Houses

The article on this house in Volume Two begins:

"Stones of many dates give evidence that the Graut family held this property for a minimum of three centuries".

However, three three stones at the property, to which she refers, have dates of 1786, 1840 and 1870 - hardly evidence of three centuries ownership. Perhaps she intended to write three generations. The Graut family certainly has roots in Jersey which go back at least to the 16th century, but how old La Rigondaine is and how long the family owned it is a matter for conjecture. If the house had been in the same family for three centuries it would be old enough to have merited a place in Volume One of Old Jersey Houses, but it is included in the second volume and it certainly has every appearance of a typical 18th century Jersey farmhouse. It is believed to have been constructed in 1786, when the two earlier houses were demolished.

Derivation of name

There is dispute among historians and etymologists over the meaning of La Rigondaine. In a 1907 article on Jersey placenames, added to Jerripedia in 2018, the Rev J A Messervy refers to La Rogodaine, a nearby location, and apparently to the house featured here:

"This strange word, with an archaic sound, appears to us to be a corruption and a contraction of the two words Roque = rock and Godesme, an abbreviation of Nicodeme. This derivation has been suggested to us by reading an act of 1541, among others, in which Grouville is called La Roque Godesne, and a contract of 1607 in which there is the question of the house of Jean Pirouet, son of Jacques, near Rocque Godesne at Grouville."

But an article in the 1975 Annual Bulletin of La Société Jersiaise by C G Stevens, L B Mallalieu, G Bernier and C A R Radford refers in passing to La Rigondaine and dismisses a connection between Rigondaine and Rogodaine:

"The meaning of La Rigondaine, name of a hamlet in Grouville, has not yet been discovered, but is probably unconnected with Rogodaine, a rocky outcrop not far off, which was associated in legend with St Magloire, and exploded by quarrymen in 1868. In our placenames the termination -aine is common enough .... but -daine is rare, occurring only in Rigondaine, Rogodaine and the legendary land of Gigourdaine .... the etymology of -daine has not yet been studied, but it appears to mean 'the country of' the person whose name precedes it."

Notes and references

  1. Each probably relating to one of the three Josue Grauts
  2. The Datestone Register records this stone as IDLM IAN 1831, but says that it may be FDLM IAH 1831. There are no marriage records to match the second option.

The house in 2018

These are estate agency photographs of the house in 2018, when it was offered for sale at £2½ million

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