No 45 King Street

From Jerripedia
Jump to: navigation, search


W16StreetLamp.png


45 King Street


E17KerdalEnvelope.jpg


A letter sent by Julien Kerdal to a French fruit supplier in 1909


It is not believed that Miss Gruchy had a shop at No 45 King Street, but she may have run a business privately from the first floor. She and her sister then traded at No 64 King Street
1942, and Maison Kerdal is on the left of the picture
Another picture of the King Street/New Street junction, taken in 1929.

This property forms the western corner of New Cut and King Street. There is a reference in an advertisement for Au Gagne Petit on the opposite corner at No 43 to it being 'opposite Parr's Bank'. We do not know the date of this advert but it was presumably after 1908 when Jersey bank Robin Brothers, was acquired by Parr's Bank, which eventually became part of Royal Bank of Scotland. We have not been able to establish whether or not the bank operated from No 45.

Draper

The first recorded business here was W Goff's drapery in 1837.

Grocery

Thomas Egbert Huelin's had established a grocery by 1851. No 45 was a very busy property, with five separate households. Thomas (35) lived there with his wife Esther, nee Pepin, and their young family, two sons and two daughters ranging in age from one month to eight years.

Ten years later the family has not only moved to nearby Don Street, but Thomas has changed trade from grocery to become a tailor with 16-year-old son Thomas, while daughter Esther (17) has become a milliner. The other households at No 45 were widowed cook Harriet Owens (46) and her three lodgers, who included Chelsea Pensioners Henry O’Donell and Thomas Barnes; porter John Derwin, his wife Harriet and their son and three daughters; dressmaker Sophie Gallichan, who lived along; and coachman Henry Pillow (25, wife Jane (24) and their one-year-old son James.

By 1861 all of these housholds had left No 45, where Philip Hamon was in business as a draper with his wife Eliza. They would remain there, or in the part of the property which became 45½, until after 1880. The 1861 census shows Philip (1835- ) and wife Eliza (1833- ) at No 45. Although their business appears still to have been there in 1871, they must have moved their home elsewhere, because the census shows the occupants as milliner Margaret Gruchy (1828- ) and her dressmaker sister Esther (1830- ).

Shoemakers

By 1881 shoemaker James Potter and his family have moved in, and his business was to operate there for over 25 years. A substantial business it was, too, because the 1881 census shows that James, who was born in America, employed '23 hands'. James (1833- ) and his wife Mary (1821- ) were living with their children James (1856- ), Frederick (1859- ), Lydia (1862- ) and Florence (1864- ). Ten years later the household consisted of just James, son James and the two daughters. Mary must have died and Frederick left home.

By 1901 the business was in the hands of son James, who lived with wife Janet (1860- ) and their children Kathleen (1893- ), Winifred (1895- ), Stanley (1896- ) and Robert (1898- )

Grocery again

The premises were acquired by Julian Kerdal by 1909 and his grocery operated there until 1930. Julian (1862- ) came to Jersey from Plumelec, France (not Plumtree, as transcribed in Ancestry's census records!) and his wife Seraphine was from nearby Plouguerneau (1865- ). They had three daughters, Julia (1894- ), Blanche (1896- ) and Jeanne (1898- ), who were born while they were in business earlier at 7 Burrard Street. Julien was described in the 1901 census as a 'potato, egg and butter merchant'.

He was the last of 11 children of Vincent Kerdal (1810-1869) and Jeanne, nee Danet (1820-1886), which probably explains why he same to Jersey to seek his fortune. He would have been in his 30s when he arrived, because there is no mention of the family before the 1901 census and the birth of their daughters in the previous decade.

It is not clear when Julien died because there is no death record for him, but his will was dated 13 Septem,ber 1920. Seraphine continued to run the business after his death but it is not clear whether, when it changed to Maison Kerdal, and sold fancy goods and cigars, rather than groceries, she was still in charge. The business continued after the Occupation and into the 1970s.

An envelope sent by Julien, possibly to a supplier in Le Mans, France, in 1909, shows that as well as trading at 45 King Street, his business had other premises in Charing Cross.

Chronology

The division of the property into two, effected some time before 1874, caused considerable headaches for almanac publishers. In 1874 draper Philip Hamon was shown at 45½, in 1880 at 45, in 1886 at 45a. There is no mention of 45½ in census returns until 1891

  • 1837 - W Goff, draper and tailor
  • 1851 - Thomas Huelin grocer
  • 1861-1880 - Philip Hamon, draper (at 45 or 45½)
  • 1873 - Miss C Gruchy, Milliner
  • 1881 - James Potter, shoemaker
  • 1890 - Potter's boot warehouse; D E Le Brocq, tailor
  • 1900 - Potter's boot warehouse and D Allwood
  • 1903 - Potter's boot warehouse
  • 1906-1930 - Julian Kerdal, grocer
  • 1940-1990 - Maison Kerdal, wines and spirits
  • 2000 - Accessorize
  • 2010 - Coffee Republic
Looking towards the New Street junction. No 45 is the shop with the striped green blind on the right
Personal tools
other Channel Islands
contact and contributions
Donate

Please support Jerripedia with a donation to our hosting costs